Collaborating with community stakeholders to help serve underserved populations

HIV CBA

NCHP has been an active participant in the fight against HIV/AIDS since the early 1990s.

Utilizing funding from Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to provide HIV/AIDS prevention education for ethnic minorities, at-risk, and underserved populations in all 50 states and 8 U.S. territories.  A range of capacity building services are also available for community based-organizations and health departments. The goals of NCHP’s capacity building project are to enhance an organization’s core competencies in infrastructure development, program sustainability, evidence-based interventions and public health strategies.

NCHP HIV Education Program Highlights

  • Utilizing funding from Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to provide HIV/AIDS prevention education for ethnic minorities, at-risk, and underserved populations in all 50 states and 8 U.S. territories.  A range of capacity building services are also available for community based-organizations and health departments. The goals of NCHP’s capacity building project are to enhance an organization’s core competencies in infrastructure development, program sustainability, evidence-based interventions and public health strategies.
  • Extending capacity building assistance (CBA) services to organizations serving Latino populations in the southern region of the United States (13 states total). Participants include at-risk men, women, transgender, men who have sex with men (MSM), youth, people who inject drugs, HIV+, HIV-unknown serostatus, and pregnant women.
  • Partnering with El Rio Community Health Center in Tucson to provide outreach, education, and services to HIV+ Latino heterosexual women and other underserved HIV+ populations in the U.S.-Mexico border area. This “Special Project of National Significance” was made possible through funding from the HIV/AIDS Bureau of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Implementing the "Border CAPT" project with funding from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), NCHP provided substance abuse and HIV/AIDS prevention services along the U.S.-Mexico border region as well as capacity building services to state and local health departments and community-based organizations working with drug users and other “at risk” populations.

NCHP's CBA Program

"Capacity Building" generally refers to a process to increase the skills, infrastructure, and resources of individuals, organizations and communities. Capacity building is a key strategy for the promotion, delivery and sustainability of HIV prevention programs. As a result of capacity building on HIV prevention programs, the programs will (1) operate optimally and (2) increase their capacity to effectively deliver evidence-based interventions and core public health strategies for HIV prevention.

Capacity Building Assistance or "CBA" provision is free and available to individuals, organizations and communities through a variety of methods including the following:

  • Training
  • Technical assistance (TA)
  • Technology transfer to individuals

Our CBA is provided directly to communities, community–based organizations and public health departments throughout the country. CBA services do not include the direct delivery of HIV prevention services; rather, CBA services include information transfer, skills-building exercises, and ongoing mentorship.

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NCHP CBA Brochure

 

What is HIV?

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Because HIV and AIDS reduce the effectiveness of the immune system, persons with HIV/AIDS are susceptible to infections and tumors that can cause pulmonary, gastrointestinal, and neurological problems. Although current treatments have reduced AIDS-related mortality and morbidity, there is currently no vaccine or cure for the disease.

HIV is present in blood, semen, vaginal fluids, and breast milk, and is transmitted when the virus comes into direct contact with the bloodstream or a mucous membrane. Thus, the virus may be transmitted by oral, vaginal, or anal sex, the use of contaminated hypodermic needles and syringes, or from mother to child during pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding.

The CDC estimates that more than one million people in the United States are living with HIV, and more than one in five (21%) are unaware of their infection. The annual number of new infections has remained relatively stable in recent years, with an estimated 56,300 Americans infected each year. More than half a 576,000 people in the U.S. have died of AIDS since the epidemic began in the early 1980s.

Source:
http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/resources/
factsheets/us.htm
 - accessed 8/19/2011